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Saint Dominic Academy strives to offer its students every opportunity to academically excel through rigorous instruction across a diverse offering of courses. 
  • College Preparation courses cover the basic content of an academic discipline and require students to complete homework and other assignments outside of class. 
  • Honors courses delve more deeply into the subject matter of the class and require additional time outside of class for study and assignments.
  • Advanced Placement (AP) courses correspond to nationally recognized standards of academic rigor and offer motivated students the opportunity to participate in college-level coursework while enrolled in high school. AP classes are taken by students who demonstrate academic aptitude and a willingness to devote significant effort to class work after school.  By taking AP courses, students can earn college credit while in high school, allowing them to stand out in the college admissions process and gain skills that will help to be successful in future higher learning.

Course Offerings:

          
          
          

English

All students must take and complete four English credits in order to graduate. Listed below are descriptions for the courses students may take as they progress from freshman to senior year.

During freshman year, students are introduced to various types of literature (novel, short story, play, poem, and essay) and develop writing, thinking and speaking skills. Students develop writing skills through vocabulary and grammar study. Writing assignments include: composition, character and theme analysis, creative writing and research papers.
Enrollment in an honors course requires a “B” average in the preceding English course or permission of the Guidance Department.
 
161 ENGLISH I - COLLEGE (1 credit)
The central goal of the first semester is to develop writing and critical thinking skills. Students consistently use the Writing Process, with an emphasis on revising. This prepares students to write effectively in all subject areas. Students will write clear and concise sentences, develop well-thought-out thesis statements and thought-provoking conclusions, which will be demonstrated through expository, persuasive, narrative and descriptive essays. Grammar and vocabulary are stressed.

During the second semester, the focus is on literature. Students are introduced to major literary concepts that build on composition skills, focusing on analysis, personal response, and evaluation. Students will read a multiplicity of classical and contemporary texts, including novels, short stories, plays, poems, and essays.
 
162 ENGLISH I - HONORS (1 credit)
The first semester develops writings and critical thinking skills. Students consistently use the Writing Process, with an emphasis on revising. This prepares students to write effectively in all subject areas. Students will write clear and concise sentences, develop well-thought-out thesis statements and thought to provoke conclusions, which will be demonstrated through expository, persuasive, narrative and descriptive essays. Grammar and vocabulary are stressed.
During the second semester, the focus is on literature. Students are introduced to major literary concepts that build on composition skills, focusing on analysis, personal response, and evaluation. Students will read a multiplicity of classical and contemporary texts, including novels, short stories, plays, poems, and essays. This course requires students to read intensely and widely and to write focused and ordered compositions.
 
163 ENGLISH II - COLLEGE (1 credit)
The thematic concepts of romance, tragedy, irony, and comedy are explored through close readings of the text. Vocabulary and composition skills are further developed. Various techniques of expository writing are introduced including abstracts of articles, speculative and critical essays, and the use of evidence to support a thesis. Considerable emphasis is placed on the components of fiction and poetry. A five to the seven-page research paper is required. This course is designed for students requiring a more deliberate pace of study and places particular importance on reading for comprehension.
 
164 ENGLISH II - HONORS (1 credit) 
The Honors Program continues to focus on reading, writing and speaking skills. Students read a variety of works across literary genres and respond to readings through response journals, creative pieces, and formal essays. While students' responses to the literature drive class discussions, the teacher supplements these discussions with lessons about traditional interpretive frameworks to assist students in their search to create meaning from the text. Students participate in writing process activities. Throughout the year, students learn strategies to increase their vocabularies, to vary their reading, writing and speaking for different purposes, and to think explicitly about their own learning styles. During the second semester, students complete a research paper and learn the basic methods and strategies of performing literary research.
 
165 ENGLISH III AMERICAN LITERATURE - COLLEGE (1 credit)
The college preparatory junior English curriculum focuses on American literature as a means to further develop expository and critical thinking skills. Students examine the American Literary movements through a chronological survey of major writers such as Hawthorne, Poe, Whitman, Dickinson, and Fitzgerald as well as more contemporary writers. Due to the significance of Shakespeare’s works, students also read selected pieces from his collection. Essay writing further develops the use of direct evidence to support critical thinking. Vocabulary, grammar and SAT prep continue.
 
166 ENGLISH III AMERICAN LITERATURE - HONORS (1 credit)
This course focuses on selections from assorted genres by major American writers. Because of the significance of Shakespeare’s works, students read selected pieces from his oeuvre. Students read a variety of American novels, short stories, plays, and poems. Writing assignments are frequent. Creative writing, critical essays, and analytical essays are the focus of writing assignments. They include but are not limited to commentary and criticism of the literary works read. Vocabulary is stressed and independent reading is assigned regularly. Students are expected to read extensively in this course.
 
167 ENGLISH IV - COLLEGE (1 credit)
The goal of this course is to prepare students for writing and communicating their ideas in a college classroom. Students master reading comprehension skills by reading essays, short stories, poetry, drama, and novels. The course also includes a review of proper English conventions and the continued study of college-level vocabulary. Students write extensively with teacher support, sampling a variety of expository styles. Reading assignments focus on themes in British literature before moving into a study of social justice issues. The course culminates with a senior presentation that incorporates research, writing, and reflection in a formal school presentation.
 
168 ENGLISH IV - HONORS  (1 credit)
English IV is a course for advanced students to master writing and communicating their ideas in a college classroom. Students demonstrate reading comprehension skills by reading essays, short stories, poetry, drama, and novels; the majority of reading is done outside of class. It is assumed that enrolled students have mastered the basics of English language conventions and regularly use a college-level vocabulary. The entire first quarter is dedicated to mastering college-level writing with papers assigned every week. Reading assignments focus on themes in British literature before moving into a study of social justice issues. The course culminates with a senior presentation that incorporates research, writing, and reflection in a formal school presentation.
 
131 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION - ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit)
(This course is open to qualified students in both grades 11 and 12. It rotates in the schedule with AP English Literature and Composition---students with a particular strength and interest in the study of English should plan to take both courses over two years. Students might also consider AP English as a junior and take English IV Honors without an interruption of material.)
This course helps students become independent readers, creative and mature writers, and effective speakers. Readings range across disciplines, genres, and styles, including both British and American works, with an emphasis on non-fiction and current events. Students focus on three formal aspects of language: grammar, rhetoric, and logic. In keeping with the AP course description, the class time will be a cooperative venture between students and the teacher; students should assume considerable responsibility for the amount of reading and writing they do. It is assumed that students have not only a high level of reading comprehension, vocabulary and writing skills but a love for the subject matter and a desire to push themselves beyond the boundary of a typical classroom. Writing and speaking skills are further developed in a collaborative workshop format, as well as in one-on-one coaching with the instructor. A major thesis paper is required based on the individualized interests and needs of each student.
 
132 AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION - ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit)
(This course is open to qualified students in both grades 11 and 12. It rotates in our schedule with AP English Language and Composition; students with a particular strength and interest in the study of English could plan to take both courses over two years. Students might also consider AP English as a junior and take an English IV Honors without interruption of material.)
This course is designed for students with a love of literature and language to immerse themselves in an exploration of the power of the written word. Both British and American literature will be examined as the basis for exploration, and students will have the opportunity for free-choice reading with the goal of stretching their reading skills to a new level. In keeping with the AP course description, the class time will be a cooperative venture between students and the teacher; students should assume considerable responsibility for the amount of reading and writing they do. It is assumed that students have not only a high level of reading comprehension, vocabulary, and writing skills but also a love for the subject matter and a desire to push themselves beyond the boundary of a typical classroom. Writing and speaking skills will be developed in a collaborative, workshop format, as well as in one-on-one coaching with the instructor. A major thesis paper is required based on the individualized interests and needs of each student.

 

 

Mathematics

All students must take and complete three (3) years of math to graduate from Saint Dominic Academy. The minimum courses and progression of courses are as follows: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. Listed below are the courses and descriptions for students to choose from to fulfill their requirement. Students who anticipate pursuing an advanced study in mathematics or science are encouraged to maximize the opportunities the Mathematics Department offers. Many students pursuing other courses of study find that mathematics helps them to embrace a disciplined course of study.
 
119 ALGEBRA I - COLLEGE (1 credit)
This course prepares students with average mathematical skills for further work in high school mathematics. The course makes a connection with other math courses previously studied. Main concepts studied include variables and expressions, solving equations, graphing, polynomials, factoring, and an introduction to functions and relations.
 
120 ALGEBRA I - HONORS (1 credit)
This is an accelerated course of introductory secondary school math. Topics include a review of basic arithmetic operations, the introduction of variables in multiple applications, the concept of one and two dimensional graphing, polynomial expressions including factoring and exponents, and applications of functions and inequalities. Many of the topics will be applied to word problems and general problem solving real-life situations. 
SUMMER HOMEWORK:  The students will be assigned summer homework which will include doing problems concerning the concepts of the properties of real numbers.  The homework will be turned in during the first week of classes and will be evaluated as a homework grade.  In addition, a quiz will be administered during the first week of school, after a brief review of the material. Help sessions will be scheduled before the due date.
 
184 GEOMETRY - COLLEGE - (1 credit)
This course stresses the basic structure of geometry with a brief introduction to proofs.  Basic concepts studied include the simplest geometric shapes and their relationships; properties of triangles, polygons, and circles; trigonometry basics.  The importance of algebraic properties in relationship to geometric diagrams is also covered
 
185 GEOMETRY - HONORS (1 credit)
This is an accelerated course developed for students with above-average mathematical and problem-solving skills.  The focus of the course is Euclidean Geometry; however, spherical geometry will be explored.  The course stresses inductive and deductive reasoning which will enable students to use an axiomatic system to communicate their reasoning in a variety of forms of proofs and to develop conjectures.  Main concepts studied include the relationships between lines, angles, and circles; properties of geometric shapes; the application of algebraic properties to geometric diagrams; similar and congruent figures; right triangle trigonometry; constructions; areas and volumes; and real-life applications. Constructions will be integrated throughout the course.
PREREQUISITE: “A+” in Algebra I CP or permission of the Guidance Department
 
123 ALGEBRA II AND TRIGONOMETRY - COLLEGE  (1 credit)
This course was developed for students with average Algebra I and Geometry skills. The focus of the course is to develop computational problem-solving skills necessary for Advanced Math and/or College Algebra. Main concepts studied include properties of real numbers, inequalities, factoring, rational expressions, systems of equations, complex numbers and an extensive introduction of trigonometry.
      
122 ALGEBRA II - HONORS (1 credit)
This course stresses an in-depth study of algebra and the development of computational problem-solving skills. Structures and the properties of real numbers are reviewed and extended. This course also includes a treatment of inequalities, absolute values, graphing, determinants, rational expressions, systems of linear equations, methods of solving quadratic equations, complex numbers, polynomials, and logarithms.
PREREQUISITE: "B" average in Algebra I and Geometry Honors or permission of the Guidance Department
 
244 TRIGONOMETRY - HONORS 1st & 2nd Semesters (.5 credit)
Students who are enrolled in Pre-Calculus Honors are required to take Trigonometry Honors during the first semester. This course studies angles and their trigonometric functions. Students study the rotation of these angles and their relationship to right triangles. Other topics investigated include reference angles and their uses, graphs of the trigonometric functions, identities, functions of the sum of two angles, inverse trigonometric relations, and oblique triangles.
PREREQUISITE: "B" in Algebra II (H) or permission of the Guidance Department
 
218 PRE-CALCULUS - HONORS (1 credit)
This is a top-flight math course for juniors and seniors planning pre-med, engineering, math, or any science-related field. It is also a preparatory course for any student anticipating taking Advanced Placement Calculus. Topics include solving equations and inequalities, conic sections, polynomial functions, exponents, logs, sequences and series, complex numbers, trigonometry, and matrices.  A graphing calculator is required (TI-84 Plus is preferred).
PREREQUISITE: "B" in Algebra II Honors and in Trig Honors or concurrent enrollment in Trig Honors or permission of the Guidance Department.
 
117 ADVANCED MATH - COLLEGE (1 credit)
This course is designed for the college bound student who is not planning to major in mathematics or science. Topics include coordinate geometry, inequalities, functions, trigonometry, exponents and logs, graphs, and complex numbers. Students must have a basic scientific calculator.
PREREQUISITE: "C" in Algebra II and Trig or permission of the Guidance Department
 
129 AP CALCULUS AB – ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit)
This advanced math course is for the student who is planning a career involving mathematics. A strong knowledge of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and pre-calculus is needed. Topics include functions, derivatives, integration, limits, differential equations, logs, areas, volumes and slope fields. Students should expect an average of six hours of homework each week. A graphing calculator is required. The Texas Instruments are the preferred choice (TI84 Plus). This course is also a good preparation for the AP Calculus AB Exam taken in the Spring.
PREREQUISITE: "B" in Trigonometry (H) and Pre-Calculus (H) or permission of the Guidance Department         
 
913 STATISTICS (HONORS) (1 credit)
Statistics is an elective math course for juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Algebra II. This course will engage students to think statistically in the real world by teaching them how to analyze data, gather data, explore relationships between variables, and use probability to make decisions about data. It will include a basic introduction on using hypothesis testing to make inferences about data. A graphing calculator is required (TI-84 Plus is preferred).
 
714 AP Statistics (1 credit)
This course is designed to cover a broad range of statistical topics including methods used to gather, organize, describe, analyze and draw conclusions from data. Students will learn how to describe patterns, plan and conduct studies, explore random phenomena using probability, and test hypotheses. Students will use technology to help with statistical analysis. AP Statistics will prepare students to take the AP statistics exam in May. It is not intended to replace Pre-calculus or AP Calculus.  A graphing calculator is required (TI-84 Plus is preferred).
 

Science

All students are required to take and complete three (3) years of a science, and half (.5) a year of health to be graduated from Saint Dominic Academy. Listed below are the courses for students to choose from to fulfill their requirement. Students are encouraged to take more than the required courses if they are pursuing a medical or science field.
 
145 BIOLOGY — COLLEGE (1 credit)
This course in biology introduces students to those properties that are unique to and define life. Organisms from the simplest unicellular to the most complex multicellular are studied from both a taxonomic and systemic approach. Laboratory investigations and special projects supplement the material presented in class.
 
146 BIOLOGY — HONORS (1 credit)
This course deals with the properties that are unique to living organisms. The biochemical, cellular, and genetic basis of life is studied in detail in order that life processes at higher levels might be better understood. Cytology, genetics, taxonomy, microbiology, and zoology are some of the major topics to be covered. Laboratory investigations are conducted in order to help students gain a better understanding of principles covered in class.
 
153 CHEMISTRY — COLLEGE (1 credit)
This course is designed to introduce the college preparatory student to the ideas of chemical principles as they apply to everyday life and to practice a qualitative description of those principles. The phenomena studied include the structure of atoms and molecules, periodic properties, principles of chemical reactions, energy and transfer of heat as well as applications of gas laws. This introductory course integrates theoretical concepts and laws with related laboratory experiments.
PREREQUISITE:   Satisfactory completion of previous mathematics and science courses.
                          (Algebra II/Trig. may be taken concurrently with Chemistry)
 
155 CHEMISTRY — HONORS (1 credit)
This course requires the study of chemical principles from a quantitatively rigorous point of view and is specially designed for students who wish to hold open the option of pursuing scientific, technical, or medical careers. Major topics of study include atomic and molecular theory, types of reactions and bonding, inorganic chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry; properties of solutions and principles of molarity and titration in acid-base reactions. The course focus is on the writing and development of formal laboratory reports, integration of Algebra II skills in multi-step problem solving and discussion/explanation of various chemical principles. The course integrates theoretical concepts with laboratory experiments.
PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of previous mathematics and science courses, with at least a “B” average.
 (Algebra II Honors may be taken concurrently with Chemistry Honors)
 
932 AP CHEMISTRY - (1 credit) — Juniors and Seniors
This course will cover topics not included in Honors Chemistry such as:
Gases – Pressure, Boyle’s Law, Charles Law, Ideal Gas Law
Liquids and Solids – Phase Changes, Evaporation, Vapor Pressure
Solutions – Solubility, Molarity, Dilution, Normality
Acid and Bases – Acid Strength, ph Scale, Buffered Solutions
Equilibrium – Equilibrium Condition, Chemical Equilibrium,
Oxidation-Reduction Reactions and Electrochemistry – Oxidation States, Batteries
Radioactivity – Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Fission, Nuclear Fusion
Organic Chemistry. 
This course will prepare the students to take the AP Chemistry Exam
 
216 PHYSICS — HONORS (1 credit) – JUNIORS & SENIORS ONLY
Honors Physics is an in-depth, inquiry-based class that is designed for advanced science students. This rigorous course utilizes theoretical and physical models to promote the understanding of the concepts and the mathematical relationships associated with mechanics, energy, waves and optics, and electricity and magnetism. In addition to a strong science aptitude, a thorough understanding and facility in algebra, geometry and right triangle trigonometry are essential. Physics is recommended for college-bound students interested in science and math. Students must have a basic scientific calculator.
PREREQUISITE: "B" in Algebra II Honors and Trig. Honors and/or permission of the Guidance Department.
 
138 AP PHYSICS 1 — ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit) JUNIORS & SENIORS ONLY
AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based is the equivalent of a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics, but it is designed to be taught over the full academic year to enable AP students to develop a deep understanding of the content and to focus on applying their knowledge through inquiry labs. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It also introduces electric circuits.
 
138 AP PHYSICS 2 — ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit) SENIORS ONLY
AP Physics 2: Algebra-Based is the equivalent of a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics, but it is designed to be taught over the full academic year to enable AP students to develop a deep understanding of the content and to focus on applying their knowledge through inquiry labs. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; and atomic and nuclear physics.
PREREQUISITE: AP Physics 1
 
705 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY — HH (1 credit)
Anatomy and Physiology is an advanced course intended for students interested in the health-related fields and who wish to pursue the study of the human body systems from the structural and functional perspectives. The anatomy of each system is approached at the gross and microscopic levels. Students are expected to master anatomical and physiological concepts with the help of lectures, laboratory sessions, and special projects. Detailed dissection of the mink enables students to visualize the systems in relation to one another and to come to an understanding and appreciation of the intimate connection between structure and function of organs and systems.
PREREQUISITE: "B" in biology and chemistry or permission of the Guidance Department
 
128 AP BIOLOGY — ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit)
AP Biology is a course that is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors. The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to gain an appreciation of science as a process. The major topics included in AP Biology are molecules and cells, genetics, heredity and evolution, and animal communities and populations. Laboratory assignments will account for approximately one-quarter of the course and will require a higher level of problem-solving, research methods, data recording and interpretation, and laboratory techniques. Projects and individual study will accompany lectures to prepare students for collegiate study in the biological sciences.
PREREQUISITE: "B" in biology and chemistry or permission of the Guidance Department.
                           Anatomy and Physiology Recommended.
 
225 ROBOTICS — SCIENCE AND ELECTRIC Sem 2 (.5 credit)
This one-semester course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of programming and robotics. Programming and building robots applies science, technology, engineering and math concepts. For more information about our Robotics Team click here. 
 
910 —ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE H (1 credit)
Environmental Science is the study of interrelationships between human activities and the environment. This honors level course will use scientific knowledge about the natural world, as well as an understanding about ways in which humans interact with the natural world. We examine effects of human actions on the environment, and the means by which policies, regulations, and decisions influence human actions with a strong emphasis in biology, geology, and chemistry.  Laboratory investigations are conducted to help students gain a better understanding of principles covered in class
 
912 —PHYSICS CONCEPTS CP (1 credit)
As humans, we all must daily interact with the physical world around us. When we not only observe, but also understand the rules of nature that govern our physical world we are more fulfilled, and well-rounded individuals. Physics is a basic science. It is the foundation for biology, chemistry, geology, and all other sciences. Therefore, what you learn in Conceptual Physics will be the basis on which all your knowledge from the disciplines of science builds. While the rules of nature can often be described mathematically, it is not the only way to describe them. It is the goal of Conceptual Physics to facilitate your understanding of the rules of nature by learning their foundations, not by learning their mathematical derivations.
 
909 —FORENSICS H (FUNDAMENTALS & INVESTIGATIONS) Sem 1 (.5 credit)
This course focuses on the types of evidence and techniques behind crime scene investigation and forensic science. We will study true-life stories and use physics, chemistry, anatomy, cell biology, environmental science and computer science in the process of learning about forensic science. You will study topics such as collection, handling and analysis of trace evidence such as hair, fibers and soil; fingerprints, DNA analysis, forensic botany and firearms and ballistics. This course should help you see how science is used to answer questions rather than just learning science concepts. It should be a very enjoyable course.
 
914 CP / 911 H — EARTH & SPACE SCIENCE (1 credit)
This class will be a Socratic-dialogue driven, collaborative learning introduction to Astronomy and Earth Science. It is designed to elicit your curiosity and understanding of the universe and our home planet’s relationship to the cosmos. We will study the stars and the night sky, fundamentals of Astronomy, the nature of light, our solar system, galaxies, and current understanding our universe.  The Earth Science component will focus on our dynamic Earth, how it formed and processes such as plate tectonics.
 
 

Social Sciences

Students are required to take three (3) years of social studies to be graduated from Saint Dominic Academy. One (1) of these courses must be World History and one (1) must be United States History. The third credit may be taken from any of the electives listed.

Enrollment in an honors course requires a “B” average in the preceding course or permission of the Guidance Department.
 
182 WORLD GEOGRAPHY - COLLEGE (1 credit)
NINTH GRADE COURSE
The intent of World Geography is to provide knowledge and understanding of peoples and places throughout the world, and how physical geography has shaped political, cultural, and economic conditions throughout the world. The course is broken into the study of eight geographical regions. In addition to developing basic geographic skills such as map reading and data analysis, the course helps students develop their critical reading, analytical writing, and persuasive speaking skills. To support student understanding of historic and contemporary issues, a variety of primary and secondary source materials are utilized. These include historic and contemporary maps, satellite-produced images, photographs, graphs, political documents, news articles, and social and cultural commentaries. Upon completion of the course, students have a spatial perspective of the world, understanding of how countries and cultures interact, and a broad understanding of pervasive issues that characterize countries’ political, environmental, and cultural interactions. Native American studies material is covered that satisfies the requirements of State Law LD 291. Great emphasis is placed on writing along with learning about a variety of cultures and the factors that contributed to their greatness.
 
183 WORLD GEOGRAPHY – HONORS (1 credit)
NINTH GRADE COURSE
In Honors World, Geography students examine the physical, political, cultural, and economic geography of the eight major geographical regions of the world. Students come to understand how physical geography has shaped political, cultural, and economic conditions throughout the world. In addition to developing basic geographic skills such as map reading, demographic information gathering, and data analysis, the course helps students develop their critical reading, analytical writing, and persuasive speaking skills. To support student understanding of historic and contemporary issues, a variety of primary and secondary source materials are utilized. These include historic and contemporary maps, satellite-produced images, photographs, graphs, political documents, news articles, and social and cultural commentaries. Upon completion of the course, students have a spatial perspective of the world, understanding of how countries and cultures interact, and a broad understanding of pervasive issues that characterize countries’ political, environmental, and cultural interactions. Native American studies material is covered that satisfies the requirements of State Law LD 291.
 
251 WORLD HISTORY-COLLEGE (1 credit) / 703 WORLD HISTORY-HONORS (1 credit)
SOPHOMORE COURSE
World History highlights the economic, social, political, and cultural themes that distinguish peoples, civilizations and periods. The course also stresses common themes that unite civilizations such as social structure, philosophical and religious character, technological advancement, intellectual development, political identity, economic interaction, and environmental influences. Students profit from the experience of reaching across time and making connections with the past. Steady reading and note taking are required. Students write short and medium length essays on both factual and interpretative subjects as well as participate in debate/simulation activities. Honors classes engage in more extensive study and analysis of major movements and issues in history. This course addresses some aspects of the Civics requirement for the Maine high school students.  Native American studies material is covered that satisfies the requirements of State Law LD 291. 
 
245 U. S. HISTORY - COLLEGE / 247 U. S. HISTORY - HONORS (1 credit)
JUNIOR COURSE 
United States History surveys American history from colonial times to the present. Students study the political, social, cultural, and economic events and people that have shaped the United States. Emphasis is placed on understanding how this nation came to be, how it survived through wars, dissension, and reforms, and how it has evolved into the democratic, pluralistic, and technologically advanced society that it is today. Students profit from the experience of reaching across time and making connections with the past. Extensive reading and note taking are required. Students write short and medium length essays on both factual and interpretative subjects. Honors classes engage in more extensive study and analysis of major movements and issues in history. This survey course also serves as the Civics requirement for Maine high school students.
 
246 AP UNITED STATES HISTORY - ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit)
The AP U.S. History course familiarizes students with American historical issues, figures, events, and movements. Through readings, discussions, debates, and writings, students come to know not only the What of our history but also the Why. The course's steady and expansive reading and writing requirements encourage students to develop critical and independent learning skills and habits. By intensively reading and writing on significant issues, AP U.S. History students become more efficient, insightful, and independent readers and writers.  Students' research skills are enhanced as they work with original documents, maps, data, and speeches.  Additionally, the AP seminar format and the course's emphasis on small learning groups help students learn to express themselves comfortably and confidently and to work cooperatively. Students are prepared to take the AP exam in the Spring.  This course also serves as the Maine Civics requirement for high school students.
PREREQUISITE: “A-” in World History Honors or permission of the teacher and Guidance Department
 
223 PSYCHOLOGY - HONORS (1 credit)  
Psychology is the study of mental processes and behavior. This course introduces students to the scientific and systematic study of mental processes and behavior of humans and other animals. Students will delve into the major subfields of psychology and also focus on the ethics and methods psychologists use in their field of study. This course requires extensive reading augmented by papers/projects and experiential learning. Priority is given to Seniors.       
                           
663 AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS - ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit)
Students survey and analyze the major processes and institutions of American government. Course topics include historical and contemporary constitutional issues, recurring struggles in the United   States over democracy, conflicts over executive, legislative and judicial power; the rise of the administrative state; development of civil liberties and civil rights; and political beliefs and behavior. The AP seminar format enables students to speak out and to work cooperatively. Students are prepared to take the AP exam in the spring.
PREREQUISITE:   “B” average in United States History honors or “C+” average in AP
                           United States History or permission of the teacher and Guidance Department
 
160 ECONOMICS – HONORS Sem 1 (.5 credit)
As our world becomes more interconnected, an awareness of basic economic realities and principles becomes imperative for active citizens. Honors Economics helps students develop an economic perspective on the world by introducing and examining basic economic realities and principles surrounding how societies use limited resources to satisfy unlimited wants and needs. Economics is taught in two parts. The first part provides students with an understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision-makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system (Microeconomics). Microeconomic topics include consumer demand, production, exchange, the price system, resource allocation, and government intervention. The second part of the course provides students with an understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole (Macroeconomics). Macroeconomic topics include national income, inflation, business fluctuations, unemployment, the monetary system, the federal budget, international trade, and finance.

Through reading, writing, and speaking, students develop an understanding of basic economic concepts and theories, demonstrate abilities to translate numerical data into graphs, use critical thinking skills to evaluate data, and draw inferences from current and historical data. Priority is given to seniors.
 
231 SOCIOLOGY I - HONORS Sem 2 (.5 credit)
Sociology is the scientific study of human society and social interaction. Sociology provides an unfamiliar way of looking at familiar institutions and associations. As an introduction to the discipline of sociology, this course concentrates on developing research skills as well as surveying sociological theories and techniques. In addition to acquainting the student with the basic concepts used by sociologists to explain the social world and social interaction, the course gives the student elementary skills with which to decode society and social life. The skills students learn in this course include the ability to describe, analyze, and contrast the basic value positions or perspectives which generate and shape society’s goals. Students also develop a critical understanding of the social research methods by which we discover social processes, patterns, and directions of social change. Priority is given to seniors.
 
 

Theology

Saint Dominic Academy’s theology curriculum explores the basic traditions, teachings, and community life that comprise Catholic Christianity.  Over the course of eight semester-length subject areas, students are given a robust introduction to the Christian sacred scriptures, sacramental theology, the history of the Catholic Church, ecumenical and Interreligious dialogue, vocational discernment and Catholic moral teaching, and Catholic spirituality and service.  The curriculum is grounded in the Midwest Theological Forum Didache Semester Series textbooks, which are aligned to the U.S. Bishop's catechetical framework for high school theology instruction.  

934 THEOLOGY I: SCRIPTURE AND SACRAMENTS - COLLEGE (1 credit)
Students gain comprehensive understanding of the central role that scripture and sacraments play in the Catholic faith.
 
Semester I: Sacred Scripture.  Students examine the concepts of divine revelation, inspiration, and the interpretation of scriptures.  The course presents a survey of the various texts of the Old and New testaments, giving students a broad understanding of their content, literary genre, and historical context.
 
Semester II: Sacraments.  During the second semester of the year, students survey the seven sacraments of the Catholic faith, examining in detail the history, theology, and practice of each in the life of Christians.  Beginning with the sacraments of initiation, students then move to study sacraments of vocation and healing.  The final part of the course focuses on the origins and forms of liturgy in the Catholic Church.
 
SERVICE HOURS: 6 hours each semester at an approved site
 
935 THEOLOGY II: THE CATHOLIC CHURCH, YESTERDAY AND TODAY - COLLEGE (1 credit)
Students learn about the history of the Catholic Church and about the internal structure and mission of the Church today.
 
Semester I: History of the Catholic Church.  Students study the origin and development of the Catholic faith over its 2,000 year history, beginning with the first apostles and continuing through the Roman persecution, middle ages, protestant reformation, Renaissance, enlightenment, and modern periods.  
 
Semester II: Ecclesiology and Ecumenism and Interreligious Dialogue.  The second semester leads students through the Catholic Church's mission and its organization and structure.  This course also examines key concepts regarding the role of the Church and state, religious freedom, and the importance of dialogue with other religions and with those who have no faith.
 
SERVICE HOURS: 8 hours each semester at an approved site
 
936 THEOLOGY III: VOCATION AND MORAL LIFE - COLLEGE (1 credit)
Students explore Catholic teaching regarding the meaning and purpose of life and the moral foundation that leads to true freedom and fulfillment.
 
Semester I: The first semester focuses on the Catholic understanding of a vocation as a call from God to serve him in the world.  In conjunction with their Junior retreat in November, the course looks at the various ways that people live out their vocations as single, married, or religious.  Students are encouraged to consider their own strengths and weaknesses and to think and pray about their own call in life.

Semester II: The second semester introduces students to key questions in the moral life.  What should guide human decisions?  What does it mean to be a human being?  What is the purpose of life, and what does it mean to live a good life?  The course considers the 10 Commandments and the teachings of Christ regarding the moral law and the way that the Catholic Church has interpreted these teachings over the centuries and today.
 
SERVICE HOURS: 10 hours each semester at an approved site
 
937 THEOLOGY IV: PRAYER AND SERVICE – COLLEGE (1 credit)
Students encounter the Catholic spiritual tradition and how it sustains and directs the social teaching and action of the Church.
 
Semester I: Students turn to primary texts on Catholic spirituality by C.S. Lewis, Fr. Thomas Dubay, and others.  Key questions and concepts regarding the spiritual life are introduced.  What does it mean to have a soul?  How do people pray?  What are the ways that God speaks to people, and how do we discern the difference between right and wrong?
 
Semester II: The second semester assists students in understanding the connection between the spiritual life and the love of neighbor. 
Students examine key concepts of the dignity of the human person, the rights of workers, the preferential option for the poor, and the principle of subsidiarity, among other themes.  The semester concludes with senior involvement, a four-week immersion volunteer experience at various social service organizations in the greater Lewiston/Auburn area.
 
 

World Languages

All students must take and complete two (2) consecutive years of a modern language to graduate from St.Dom's. Listed below are the courses and descriptions offered to students to fulfill their requirement.

All students must have French/English or Spanish/English dictionary.

An Honors course requires a “B” average in the preceding French course or permission of the Guidance Department in order to enroll. An enrollment in French III Honors or French IV Honors also requires permission of the Guidance Department.
 
173 FRENCH I-COLLEGE (1 credit)
This course presents a good foundation in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French. Emphasis is on vocabulary, reading, and comprehension, the study of sentence structure, regular and irregular verbs, along with some of the many grammar rules and their exceptions. Exposure to Francophone culture takes place with readings in French.
 
175 FRENCH II-COLLEGE (1 credit)
French II presents a solid review of the structural elements of French I and two past tenses. There are additional irregular verbs studied and parts of speech such as object pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs. Vocabulary naturally expands thematically, chapter by chapter. The composition is explored, reading is intensified, and French culture and the spoken language are reinforced.
 
177 FRENCH III – HONORS (1 credit)
This course provides a thorough overview of previously learned material in French I and French II. Vocabulary, grammar, and verb study are continued, with an emphasis on the indicative, subjunctive, and conditional moods, along with simple and compound verb tenses, and varied sentence structure. Students will develop their knowledge by reading a variety of texts: from ads to interviews, from essays to stories, from natural history to literature. Francophone cultural exploration is included and students will demonstrate responding to actual situations and forming and sharing opinions. Students will also demonstrate their understanding of concepts and culture by working collaboratively with other students in the classroom. Students must be willing to attempt to speak French for the majority of class time.
 
179 FRENCH IV – HONORS (1 credit)
This is an advanced French course for students who have successfully completed the French III Honors Course. The study of grammatical structure is intensified through the use of extensive writing, reading, and speaking in French. Students learn independent vocabulary enrichment as they develop their responses to particular readings, literary excerpts, analyzed dictation, and viewing and analysis of French-language films. Students delve into areas of French cultures, such as art, cuisine, music, and history of various areas of the world. The central texts to this course adapt to students’ needs and preferences, as they work collaboratively on focus areas. Students must be willing and able to communicate in French, as this course is conducted primarily in French.
 
233 SPANISH I – COLLEGE (1 credit)
This course presents a good foundation in reading, speaking, and writing Spanish. It aims at a thorough comprehension of materials nationally required in the first year of high school Spanish, such as vocabulary, reading and comprehension, structures made up of regular and irregular verbs in the present, preterit and immediate future tenses, possessive, adjectives, pronouns, objects, and more.
 
234 SPANISH II – COLLEGE (1 credit)
Spanish II presents a solid review of the structural elements of Spanish I, followed by the past tenses, future and conditional tenses, and the introduction of the subjunctive tenses, irregular verbs and adverbs, object pronouns, comparison of adjectives and adverbs, and expanded vocabulary. The directed composition is further explored, reading is intensified, and Spanish culture and the spoken language are reinforced. The second year of Spanish is devoted to grammar instruction, intensive vocabulary and enhanced reading and writing.
 
236 SPANISH III – HONORS (1 credit)
Spanish III (Honors) is conducted primarily in Spanish; therefore, students should be willing to converse in the spoken language. The course is designed to be a grammar intensive course; this means that students should have mastered the present, future, conditional and past tenses in Spanish II. Students learn more about the collective subjunctive tenses. In this course, students enhance reading comprehension by reading short stories, listening, speaking, and writing skills as well as expand their knowledge of the Spanish culture.
PREREQUISITE: "B" or better in Spanish II
 
237 SPANISH IV – HONORS (1 credit)
This is an advanced course for students that have successfully completed a Spanish III Honors course. Students should be willing to converse only in Spanish. This course is a grammar intensive course, meaning students should have mastered not only the present and preterite tenses; but also the conditional, imperfect and future tenses. Students learn more subjunctive tenses as well as informal and formal commands. The students enhance their reading, listening, and writing skills by working with different readings and literature, as well as expanding their knowledge of Spanish Culture.
PREREQUISITE:  "B" or better in Spanish III - Honors
 
 
 

Computer Science

 
152 CAD 110 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING - (.5 credit)    
Lab fee $50.00 (3 credits from Central Maine Community College)
This is an introductory CAD-based drafting and design course utilizing the latest CAD/BIM software.  In conjunction with learning CAD, students will be introduced to the process of design, the related components, and materials, research, drawing and presentation of construction-related documents, from conceptual hand sketches, CAD sketches, to CAD drawings and related spreadsheets, materials, and construction techniques.  The focus of the course is divided into three main segments.  The first segment is to introduce CAD.  The second is to introduce factors in pre-design for the building and site as it relates to programming, codes, ADA and space planning.  The third is to integrate the pre-design factors into industry standard construction/design drawings created with CAD.  
 
150 CAD 296 INTRODUCTION TO 3D STUDIO MAX - HONORS (.5 credit)
Lab fee $50.0 (3 credits from Central Maine Community College)
Students are introduced to the field of 3D modeling, animation, mediums of delivery, and trends in the industry.  Basic covered include; storyboard and animation applications and techniques, basic 3D modeling, creating and applying; framing, textures, lighting and camera principles, and techniques.
PREREQUISITE:  CAD 110 - BASIC 2D CAD (Course 876)
 
 

Fine Arts

All students must complete one credit of art to graduate from Saint Dominic Academy. Listed below are the courses available to students that fulfill this requirement. While St. Dom's encourages students to draw from the rich variety in the Art Department, students may apply to earn credits through other similarly sophisticated and expertly instructed Fine Art Programs. This credit must be pre-approved by the administration at St. Dom's. Credit cannot be counted toward the art requirement if the credit was taken prior to approval or admission into Saint Dominic Academy.  
 
All art students will be required to read art reviews from various newspapers as well as selected articles provided by the teacher from Scholastic Art Magazine.
 
242 STUDIO ART I – COLLEGE (.5 credit per semester)
Semester I
This course is a studio course based on the study of foundational principles and practices of art making. Students are exposed to aesthetics, art history, art criticism as well as art productions. There is a strong drawing component to this course. Utilizing the textbook Art Talk, students engage topics related to the process that artists have and continue to engage as they produce meaningful imagery. This class will focus its study on the making of two-dimensional work.
 
933 CERAMICS – COLLEGE (.5 credit per semester)
Semester II 
This course is a studio course based on the study of foundational principles and practices of art making. Students are exposed to aesthetics, art history, art criticism as well as art productions. Utilizing the textbook Art Talk, students will engage topics related to the process that artists have and continue to engage as they produce meaningful three-dimensional work using hand-building and wheel-thrown pottery techniques.
 
572 PHOTO/DIGITAL ART – COLLEGE (.5 credit per semester)
Semester II
This is an introductory course focused on the art of photography and digital media.  Students will work on developing a basic understanding of controlling the camera to get the perfect shot.  They will learn editing and publishing software for creating stunning digital images.   Students will use a variety of subject matters, processes, styles, and techniques while creating their photographs.  Students will be provided with numerous opportunities to make choices about their photography and digital art as they begin to develop their own personal style.
Students should have access to a SLR digital camera.  A camera where you can manually change the shutter speed/F stop (aperture).
 
723 ADVERTISING/GRAPHIC DESIGN (yearbook) – COLLEGE (1 credit)
This class introduces students to the skills used in the commercial art, graphic design and digital photography. Students study the elements and principles of art and how they relate to graphic design and photography. Students work on the design and layout of the yearbook using Josten’s Yearbook Online, additionally, students will learn about the design of newsletters, brochures, logos, and package design. Students learn digital photography and will use the school’s digi tal cameras (or bring their own) to enhance photography skills. Students must have their own laptop and demonstrate skills in graphic design or photography prior to registering. The teacher will sign permission to enroll. 
Although juniors may enroll in this class, priority is given to seniors. Prior experience with Adobe Photoshop and student needs to submit a summer assignment prior to entering the class in the fall.
PREREQUISITE: Computer Experience; own laptop; skills in graphic design or photography.
 
241 STUDIO ART – HONORS (1 credit)
JUNIOR AND SENIOR COURSE. This is an honors course offered to juniors and seniors who are highly motivated and have shown a desire to continue the study of art after the high school level. The focus of the course is to develop a portfolio for college entrance. Students are introduced to matting and photographing their work. A wide variety of mediums and techniques are explored including ceramics, sculpture, painting, drawing, and design. There is a strong drawing component and students are required to maintain a sketchbook and an art journal. Students are required to visit area exhibits and museums. Students are expected to complete weekly assignments and write reports on various areas of art.
PREREQUISITE:   Studio Art I and Recommendation of the Department Head.
                          Produce a collection of works over the summer.
 
126 AP STUDIO ART 2-D DESIGN or (127) DRAWING – ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit)
JUNIOR AND SENIOR COURSE The Advanced Placement (AP) studio art program makes it possible for highly motivated high school students to do college-level work that will focus on drawing and 2-D art to include painting, collage, printmaking, etc.  Students will develop an art portfolio for submission to the AP board for college credits.  There are two distinct types of portfolios that students may submit: 2D Design or Drawing; each has specific requirements of its own. Students will use a variety of media, styles, processes, and techniques while creating their drawings.  Students will be provided with numerous opportunities to make choices about their art as they begin to develop their own personal styles.  Students need to be independently driven and engaged in the art process.
PREREQUISITES:  Grade of 88% or better in prior Honors course or 92% or better in prior CP course or Recommendation of the Department Head.    Complete the summer art assignments by the due date.
 
 

Health & Wellness

 
187 HEALTH - COLLEGE  (.5 credit)
Semester I. This course will focus on social and mental wellness.  The course will teach students how to interact and empathize with one another and ensure students feel good about themselves and their relationships.  It will promote students’ awareness on mental health issues, help students develop their abilities to cope with challenges and stress.  Students will participate in health and wellness-related activities, create bulletin boards, write a newsletter for their peers and create a
portfolio.
MAJOR PAPERS / PROJECTS:       Quarter 1:  - Summarize and type a reaction to two health-related articles (20%) & Quarter 2: -Nutrition project (20%)
 
927 PERSONAL WELLNESS – COLLEGE (.5 credit)
Semester II. This course will focus on physical and environmental wellness.  The course will promote students’ awareness on the importance of physical activity, nutrition, various diseases and conditions, and environmental issues.  Students will participate in health and wellness-related activities, such as learning CPR and First Aid, plan a health fair, create bulletin boards, write a newsletter for their peers, and learn about health-related careers.
MAJOR PAPERS & PROJECTS: TBA