Social Studies

 

Students are required to take three (3) years of social studies to be graduated from Saint Dominic Academy. One (1) of these courses must be World History and one (1) must be United States History. The third credit may be taken from any of the electives listed.

Enrollment in an honors course requires a “B” average in the preceding course or permission of the Guidance Department.


182 WORLD GEOGRAPHY - COLLEGE (1 credit)

NINTH GRADE COURSE
The intent of World Geography is to provide knowledge and understanding of peoples and places throughout the world, and how physical geography has shaped political, cultural, and economic conditions throughout the world. The course is broken into the study of eight geographical regions. In addition to developing basic geographic skills such as map reading and data analysis, the course helps students develop their critical reading, analytical writing, and persuasive speaking skills. To support student understanding of historic and contemporary issues, a variety of primary and secondary source materials are utilized. These include historic and contemporary maps, satellite-produced images, photographs, graphs, political documents, news articles, and social and cultural commentaries. Upon completion of the course, students have a spatial perspective of the world, understanding of how countries and cultures interact, and a broad understanding of pervasive issues that characterize countries’ political, environmental, and cultural interactions. Native American studies material is covered that satisfies the requirements of State Law LD 291. Great emphasis is placed on writing along with learning about a variety of cultures and the factors that contributed to their greatness.

MAJOR PAPER / PROJECT:

- Projects every quarter
- 5 to 7 essays per quarter

 

185 WORLD GEOGRAPHY – HONORS (1 credit)

NINTH GRADE COURSE
In Honors World Geography students examine the physical, political, cultural, and economic geography of the eight major geographical regions of the world. Students come to understand how physical geography has shaped political, cultural, and economic conditions throughout the world. In addition to developing basic geographic skills such as map reading, demographic information gathering, and data analysis, the course helps students develop their critical reading, analytical writing, and persuasive speaking skills. To support student understanding of historic and contemporary issues, a variety of primary and secondary source materials are utilized. These include historic and contemporary maps, satellite-produced images, photographs, graphs, political documents, news articles, and social and cultural commentaries. Upon completion of the course, students have a spatial perspective of the world, understanding of how countries and cultures interact, and a broad understanding of pervasive issues that characterize countries’ political, environmental, and cultural interactions. Native American studies material is covered that satisfies the requirements of State Law LD 291.

MAJOR PAPER/PROJECT:         

- Projects every quarter
- 5-7 essays per quarter; participation in debate issue simulations.


251 WORLD HISTORY-COLLEGE (1 credit) (See description for W.H. Honors)


703 WORLD HISTORY-HONORS (1 credit)

SOPHOMORE COURSE
World History highlights economic, social, political, and cultural themes that distinguish peoples, civilizations and periods. The course also stresses common themes that unite civilizations such as social structure, philosophical and religious character, technological advancement, intellectual development, political identity, economic interaction, and environmental influences. Students profit from the experience of reaching across time and making connections with the past. Steady reading and note taking are required. Students write short and medium length essays on both factual and interpretative subjects as well as participate in debate/simulation activities. Honors classes engage in more extensive study and analysis of major movements and issues in history. This course addresses some aspects of the Civics requirement for the Maine high school students.  Native American studies material is covered that satisfies the requirements of State Law LD 291. 

OTHER ASSIGNED READINGS:       

Articles from books, journals and original sources.

MAJOR PAPER/PROJECT:           

Quarterly papers / projects

 

245 U. S. HISTORY - COLLEGE (1 credit)


247 U. S. HISTORY - HONORS (1 credit)

JUNIOR COURSE
United States History surveys American history from colonial times to the present. Students study the political, social, cultural, and economic events and people that have shaped the United States. Emphasis is placed on understanding how this nation came to be, how it survived through wars, dissension, and reforms, and how it has evolved into the democratic, pluralistic, and technologically advanced society that it is today. Students profit from the experience of reaching across time and making connections with the past. Extensive reading and note taking are required. Students write short and medium length essays on both factual and interpretative subjects. Honors classes engage in more extensive study and analysis of major movements and issues in history. This survey course also serves as the Civics requirement for Maine high school students.

OTHER ASSIGNED READINGS:   

Articles from books, journals, original sources and the Internet

MAJOR PAPER/PROJECT:         

1 every quarter: Paper/project 20% of quarter grade
1st Quarter – Constitution Debate
2nd Quarter – “The Jungle” and paper
3rd Quarter – Gettysburg Address recitation

ABSTRACTS:                             

Multiple Abstracts due each quarter

 

246 AP UNITED STATES HISTORY - ADVANCED PLACEMENT (1 credit)

The AP U.S. History course familiarizes students with American historical issues, figures, events and movements. Through readings, discussions, debates and writings, students come to know not only the What of our history, but also the Why. The course's steady and expansive reading and writing requirements encourage students to develop critical and independent learning skills and habits. By intensively reading and writing on significant issues, AP U.S. History students become more efficient, insightful, and independent readers and writers.  Students' research skills are enhanced as they work with original documents, maps, data, and speeches.  Additionally, the AP seminar format and the course's emphasis on small learning groups help students learn to express themselves comfortably and confidently, and to work cooperatively. Students are prepared to take the AP exam in the Spring.  This course also serves as the Maine Civics requirement for high school students.

PREREQUISITE:    “A-” in World History Honors or permission of the teacher and Guidance Department

TEXTBOOKS:  James W. Fraser, By the People, Boston: Pearson Education, 2015.
                      Barron's AP US History, 2nd edition, 2014. 
Eugene v. Resnick.

 WORK:  Richard Hofstadter, America at 1750, Vintage Books edition, New York: Random House, 1973.
                          Chapter One in Textbook

OTHER ASSIGNED READINGS:  (To be supplied by Teacher)
Jim Carnes, Us and Them: A History of Intolerance in America, Southern Poverty Law Center. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

James West Davidson and Mark Hamilton Lytle. After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection, 4th ed. New York:  McGraw-Hill, 2000.

Also, other primary and secondary sources throughout the year.


MAJOR PAPERS / PROJECTS:      
Multiple abstracts & essays per quarter

Minimum one debate per quarter

223 PSYCHOLOGY - HONORS ( 1 credit)  

Psychology is the study of mental processes and behavior. This course introduces students to the scientific and systematic study of mental processes and behavior of humans and other animals. Students will delve into the major subfields of psychology and also focus on the ethics and methods psychologists use in their field of study. This course requires extensive reading augmented by papers/projects and experiential learning. Priority given to Seniors.

MAJOR PAPERS / PROJECTS:       Quarterly papers / projects                                                    

 

135 AP  UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS - ADVANCED PLACEMENT  (1 credit)

Students survey and analyze the major processes and institutions of American government. Course topics include historical and contemporary constitutional issues, recurring struggles in the United   States over democracy, conflicts over executive, legislative and judicial power; the rise of the administrative state; development of civil liberties and civil rights; and political beliefs and behavior. The AP seminar format enables students to speak out and to work cooperatively. Students are prepared to take the AP exam in the spring.

PREREQUISITE:   “B” average in United States History honors or “C+” average in AP
                           United States History or permission of the teacher and Guidance Department

MAJOR PAPERS / PROJECTS:     

Quarter 1  Multiple abstracts per quarter
Quarter 2  National Peace Essay 20% of grade
Quarter 3  Multiple abstracts
                Margaret Chase Smith Essay

 

160 ECONOMICS – HONORS (.5 credit)

As our world becomes more interconnected, an awareness of basic economic realities and principles becomes imperative for active citizens. Honors Economics helps students develop an economic perspective on the world through introducing and examining basic economic realities and principles surrounding how societies use limited resources to satisfy unlimited wants and needs. Economics is taught in two parts. The first part provides students with an understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system (Microeconomics). Microeconomic topics include: consumer demand, production, exchange, the price system, resource allocation, and government intervention. The second part of the course provides students with an understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole (Macroeconomics). Macroeconomic topics include: national income, inflation, business fluctuations, unemployment, the monetary system, the federal budget, international trade and finance.

Through reading, writing, and speaking, students develop an understanding of basic economic concepts and theories, demonstrate abilities to translate numerical data into graphs, use critical thinking skills to evaluate data, and draw inferences from current and historical data. Priority is given to seniors.

Other Assigned Readings access to newspapers and the Internet

Major Papers/Projects:      3-4 essays per quarter / Research project every quarter.

 

231 SOCIOLOGY I - COLLEGE  (.5 credit)

Sociology is the scientific study of human society and social interaction. Sociology provides an unfamiliar way of looking at familiar institutions and associations. As an introduction to the discipline of sociology, this course concentrates on developing research skills as well as surveying sociological theories and techniques. In addition to acquainting the student with the basic concepts used by sociologists to explain the social world and social interaction, the course gives the student elementary skills with which to decode society and social life. The skills students learn in this course include the ability to describe, analyze, and contrast the basic value positions or perspectives which generate and shape society’s goals. Students also develop a critical understanding of the social research methods by which we discover social processes, patterns, and directions of social change. Priority is given to seniors.

MAJOR PAPERS/PROJECTS:         Two major research papers per year and 3-5 essays per quarter.

READINGS   Articles from books, journals, and the Internet.